Archive

WHAT WE’RE SEEING

‘Structuralism’
Het Nieuwe Institute, Museumpark 25, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Until 11 January 2015

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Herman Hertzberger’s Centraal Beheer, Apeldoorn. Image: Aviodrome Luchtfotografie

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Herman Hertzberger’s Centraal Beheer, newly reopened in 1972. Image: Johan van der Keuken

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Design by Dutch Structuralist Piet Blom, 1965. Image: Het Nieuwe Instituut.

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Herman Hertzberger. Muziekcentrum Vredenburg. Image: Herman Hertzberger

This exhibition is in two parts, the first of which focuses on the work of Herman Hertzberger, one of the main proponents of Structuralist architecture in The Netherlands. This section has been curated by Hertzberger in partnership with the Het Nieuwe Institute, which holds a collection of his work including photographs, models and over 10,000 sketches. The second part covers work by a range of architects from the movement, including Aldo van Eyck and Piet Blom. Dutch Structuralism, a movement in architecture in the late ’50s and early ’60s, is the country’s main contribution to the modern architecture of the second half of the 20th century. The institute’s director, Guus Beumer, has described it as being a ‘collectivist movement’ with a ‘deep humanistic language’. For more information on the exhibition visit the Het Nieuwe Institute website.

For modern properties for sale and to let in the UK, visit The Modern House.

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Climbing up the Thermal Store by ML_London

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Pimlico District Heating Undertaking by Gytaute Akstinaite

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The Crystal exterior facade detail by Steve Franklin

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My building detail by Michael P Mulcahy

This year’s Open House London Photography Competition received more than 700 entries, including images from professionals and enthusiasts. Ten winners were selected and announced at an awards reception at Grimshaw Architect‘s St Botolph Building, and published in the Architects’ Journal. The winners and runners up can be viewed at The Open House Flickr group and the full selection of images can be found in the General Enthusiasts and Professionals Flickr groups. For more details of Open House London and how to get involved visit the website here.

For modern properties for sale and to let in the UK, visit The Modern House.

Architects as Artists
V&A Museum: Architecture, Room 128a
Sat 15 November 2014 – Sun 29 March 2015

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A House for Essex by FAT Architecture and Grayson Perry. Image: FAT Architecture Ltd

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Egyptian temple Antony in Egypt by William Walcot, 1928. Image: RIBA

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Designs for Truro Cathedral, 1878, by William Burges. Image: Victoria and Albert Museum

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Re-Forestation of the Thames Estuary, 2010, by Tom Noonan. Image: Victoria and Albert Museum

This display examines how making art has contributed to architects’ practice, and how architects’ training has informed their art, from the Renaissance to the modern day. Drawing on the collections of the V&A Museum and RIBA, the collection of around 50 works will include a pair of digital renderings for ‘A House for Essex’, a project between FAT Architecture and the artist Grayson Perry, and Tom Noonan’s recent depiction of the re-forestation of the Thames Estuary. These images will sit alongside designs for an artist’s house by E.W. Godwin, a drawing by Raphael of the Pantheon in Rome and a lithograph by Cyril Power depicting the staircase of Russell Square tube station. For more information visit the V&A Museum website.

For modern properties for sale and to let in the UK, visit The Modern House.

Futures in the Making
Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios, London W1
13 – 28 November 2014 (Tues – Fri: 1.45pm – 6pm)

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Brooklyn Co-Operative (2014) Courtesy Yannis Halkiopoulos

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The Museum of Exchange (2014) Courtesy Alexandra McClean

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Cities: Game-Over? (2014) Courtesy James Pockson

Futures in the Making is an annual exhibition showcasing selected postgraduate students’ work from across London’s architecture schools. This year’s show, curated by a team led by Architecture Foundation Trustee Eric Parry and Architecture Foundation exhibitions curator Zofia Trafas, explores speculative architectural futures. Featured projects will range from research-based proposals for new museum sites in Sierra Leone and subversive masterplans for Swiss alpine communes, to new forms of vernacular material making and visions for the design of cyber-urban space. The exhibition is to promote debate about the future of architecture and the profession. For more information visit The Architecture Foundation.

For modern properties for sale and to let in the UK, visit The Modern House.

Oslo Opera House Photography Snohetta
Opera House in Oslo. Photography: Snøhetta

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Berlin Philharmonic concert hall

Salk Institute Louis Kahn Liao Yusheng
Salk Institute, La Jolla, California, USA. Photography: Liao Yusheng

Cathedrals of Culture, directed by six acclaimed filmmakers including Wim Wenders, is a 3D film project exploring the significance of six iconic buildings. These are the Berlin Philharmonic concert hall in Berlin, Germany; the National Library in St Petersburg, Russia; Halden Prison, the architect-designed prison in Halden, Norway; the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California, USA, designed by Louis Khan; the Opera House in Oslo, Norway, and the Richard Rogers-designed Centre Pompidou in Paris, France. Aimed at discovering ‘the soul of buildings’, the film explores a day in the life of each building, in six half-hour shorts, each narrated by the imagined voice of the building. For more information on the film, which premiered at the Berlin International Film Festival 2014, visit Neue Road Movies.

For modern properties for sale and to let in the UK, visit The Modern House.

Thursday 30th October: 6.00pm/ 7.30pm
Gospel Oak, Camden

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Ravenswood © Tim Crocker

An interesting opportunity to have a tour of a terraced house at Ravenswood, a modernist estate in north London designed by Robert Ballie for St Pancras Housing Association in 1967. Located on the edge of the estate, the house has been adapted and expanded by Maccreanor Lavington Architects and design studio Khaa. The extension, designed to complement the character of the original building, has bespoke window frames, cladding and floor in douglas fir. The one-hour evening tour will be conducted by Kay Hughes of Khaa and Richard Lavington of Maccreanor Lavington. For more information and to book tickets, visit Open-City London Architecture Tours.

For modern properties for sale and to let in the UK, visit The Modern House.

100 Buildings 100 Years: Views of British Architecture since 1914
Royal Academy, The Architecture Space, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London W1J 0BD
11 October 2014 – 1 February 2015. Sat–Thurs 10am-6pm. Fri 10am–10pm. Free entrance

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Housing by Connell, Ward and Lucas © John Allan

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Renold Building by W. Arthur Gibbon © Manchester City Council

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Benton Park School by Sir John Burnet © Sarah J Duncan

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This exhibition presents one building for each year since 1914, as selected by supporters of the Twentieth Century Society – which exists to safeguard the heritage of architecture and design in Britain from 1914 onwards. It celebrates the fact that there are now 100 years worth of buildings to campaign for. The chosen buildings range from grand architectural icons to examples of vernacular building types and structures from the war years. Together they provide a vivid illustration of the diversity of the architecture of the last 100 years. The society has created an online gallery of the selected buildings and on Friday 28th November a variety of speakers will make a case for their chosen building, in ‘Britain’s Greatest Twentieth-Century Building: The Debate‘, at the Geological Society. For more information visit the Royal Academy website.

For modern properties for sale and to let in the UK, visit The Modern House.

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